Daisies and Butts

accio-aj:

4 and a half years difference, I finally recognise myself in the mirror. Age 18 at my mum’s wedding in may 2010, a tough day having to wear a dress and attempt to look comfortable in it, but i got to change into a shirt and jeans after the ceremony/photos, the family had a great day so i couldn’t complain xD and then now at 2 years on testosterone and about 3 years after “coming out”.

accio-aj:

4 and a half years difference, I finally recognise myself in the mirror.
Age 18 at my mum’s wedding in may 2010, a tough day having to wear a dress and attempt to look comfortable in it, but i got to change into a shirt and jeans after the ceremony/photos, the family had a great day so i couldn’t complain xD and then now at 2 years on testosterone and about 3 years after “coming out”.

(via strifesolutionstower)

minigator:

when people are like “omg i love your curly hair, how do you get it to look like that?”

step one: wash hair

step two: hope for the best

(via sweartoyeezus)

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”
And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)
tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”

And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)

tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

(via sweartoyeezus)

juilan:

Because a piece of gum told me to

(via itstimetokickit)

jackanthonyfernandez:

I love how grateful he is! He loves fruit!

jackanthonyfernandez:

I love how grateful he is! He loves fruit!

(Source: acidocasualidad, via tyleroakley)

stoned-levi:

that settles it
we have to get rid of the ocean

stoned-levi:

that settles it

we have to get rid of the ocean

(Source: profile.cheezburger.com, via tyleroakley)